Foreign Media

Polarisation in the news media

BY RICHARD FLETCHER| IN RESEARCH STUDIES |27/10/2017

There is large variation across nations in the degree to which the audiences for the most popular news brands are polarised along the left–right spectrum,

 

Russian meddling and American desperation

BY SEEMA SIROHI| IN DIGITAL MEDIA |25/10/2017

Last week, three senators introduced “The Honest Ads Act” to regulate political advertising on the Internet and plug the gap in existing laws.

 

Media bias in the British elections

BY NUPUR BASU| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |12/06/2017

Owen Jones of the Guardian lambasted the “Tory press” in UK and said they had literally been baying for Corbyn’s blood.

 

Will she? Won’t she? And why won’t she?

BY NUPUR BASU| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |20/04/2017

Why Theresa May will not agree to take part in a TV debate in the forthcoming elections, is hogging the limelight

 

Net neutrality acquires a powerful new foe

BY SEEMA SIROHI| IN DIGITAL MEDIA |02/03/2017

Trump’s FCC chair Ajit Pai proves his critics right by backing corporate interests and opposing net neutrality

 

Deaf electorate or media in a bubble?

BY SEEMA SIROHI| IN OPINION |12/11/2016

The demolition of Trump – an honorable enterprise for editorial writers -- occupied the media more than investigative reporting on the people.

 

The Clinton-Trump online war

BY SEEMA SIROHI| IN DIGITAL MEDIA |05/10/2016

Facebook live videos of the US presidential debate drew 55m viewers. And Donald Trump dominated the conversation on Twitter. Here's how social media is unlocking voter sentiment in this tight presidential race.

 

Is Trump a victim of media bias?

BY SEEMA SIROHI| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |20/08/2016

It is as if large sections of “objective” journalists have decided to come to the rescue of the country and save it from a possible Trump presidency.

 

The unsung hero of the Washington Post

IN MEDIA PRACTICE |20/04/2016

The staff researcher whose work contributed to four of the six Pulitzer prizes the Post won earlier this month is profiled

 

Foley and conflict reporting

BY sevanti ninan| IN OPINION |03/09/2014

"When you start to take risks you know that it is pure luck that you didn't get killed there. It's not worth these things. It's not worth your life."

 

Gaza and a divided media

BY NUPUR BASU| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |17/08/2014

The UK media's coverage of the conflict has aroused charges of a pro-Israeli bias and re-ignited issues of objectivity.

 

A sinister war against Geo TV

BY NUPUR BASU| IN MEDIA FREEDOM |17/06/2014

First GEO TV's top anchor suffered an assassination attempt, now Pakistan's leading private channel fights for its survival against the military establishment.

 

Media helps bring change in Afghanistan

BY NUPUR BASU| IN MEDIA FREEDOM |08/04/2014

The free media covered the election in Afghanistan very well and did a wonderful job of awareness raising,

 

UK media: to regulate or not to regulate

BY NUPUR BASU| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |31/10/2013

All political parties in the UK are of the view that the press has failed to self regulate. The press, in turn, accuse the British politicians of wanting to curb press freedom through the new regulatory mechanism,

 

When Downing Street came to the Leveson Inquiry

BY NUPUR BASU| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |17/06/2012

Into its 23rd week, the inquiry has been unfolding like a gripping TV soap opera. The process of getting to the bottom of just how cosy British politicians had become with journalists has been path breaking.

 

The apology: TV captured it best

BY MAYA RANGANATHAN| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |15/02/2008

The two-week run up on television to the ‘Sorry Day’ was marked by discussions on whether the apology was indeed necessary.

 

Is journalism besieged? ?

BY Usha m Rodrigues| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |04/11/2008

A lack of resources and time are proving to be critical in the way the new generation of journalists are getting trained and mentored in the newsroom.

 

End of western domination?

BY sonwalkar| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |17/11/2006

Al Jazeera International is the nearest media equivalent to setting non-western cat among western pigeons. 

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More Asians on British TV

IN MEDIA PRACTICE |13/10/2005

Gupta and his peers have had to negotiate a long and winding road to reach their current heights.

 

Media watchdog in the Philippines

BY Frederick Noronha| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |02/03/2005

The Philippine Centre for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) is a non-profit independent media agency, specialising in investigative reporting.

 

The CNN, BBC corpse show

IN MEDIA PRACTICE |30/12/2004

Can CNN, BBC get away with this corpse show in ‘sensitive’ Manhattan?

 

American media on the abuse of Iraq prisoners

BY ninan| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |09/05/2004

Different takes from the fourth estate in the US: has the media been in denial over the abuse in Iraq?

 

Prize-winning Lies

BY Dasu Krishnamoorty| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |28/03/2004

Last fortnight a five-time Pulitzer Prize nominee made an ignominious exit from USA Today after it was confirmed that he had filed fictitious stories over two decades.

 

The media gulf war

BY naqvi| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |27/03/2004

Why Arab and US viewers get contrasting pictures from Iraq

 

Iraq: press freedom faces huge obstacles

BY IFEX| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |02/07/2003

The Coalition Provisional Authority has issued a nine-point list of prohibited activities for the media.

 

Bush-media axis on WMDs

BY Dasu Krishnamoorty| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |30/06/2003

By publishing this one-source version, the Times put its stamp of legitimacy on stories that promoted the interests of the Bush administration.

 

Arab vs. American Media: command and control?

BY Muralidhar Reddy| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |14/04/2003

Events leading to the march of the coalition soldiers into Baghdad clearly proved that Pentagon was deliberately targeting Arab media.

 

Judith Miller exits

BY dk| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |01/01/1900

A Times spokeswoman made it clear that Judith Miller would not be able to continue as a reporter of any kind, not just one covering national security.

 

 

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The new term for self censorship is voluntary censorship, as proposed by companies like Netflix and Hotstar. ET reports that streaming video service Amazon Prime is opposing a move by its peers to adopt a voluntary censorship code in anticipation of the Indian government coming up with its own rules. Amazon is resisting because it fears that it may alienate paying subscribers.                   

Clearly, the run to the 2019 elections is on. A journalist received a call from someone saying they were from Aajtak channel and were conducting a survey, asking whom she was going to vote for in 2019. On being told that her vote was secret, the caller assumed she wasn't going to vote for 'Modiji'. The caller, a woman, also didn't identify herself. A month or two earlier the same journalist received a call, this time from a man, asking if she was going to vote for the BSP.                 

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